cover ebook frontiers  

Frontiers in Plant Sciences: Studying Tree Responses to extreme Events

Bräuning, A., Bolte, A., Nabais, C., Rossi, S., Sass-Klaassen U.(eds.) (2016)

Special research topic. The COST Action FP1106 STREeSS (Studying Tree Responses to extreme Events: a SynthesiS) addresses such crucial tree biological and forest ecological issues by providing a collection of important methodological and scientific insights, about the current state of knowledge, and by opinions for future research needs.

Trees are among the longest-living organisms. They are sensitive to extreme climatic events and document the effects of environmental changes in form of structural modifications of their tissues. These modifications represent an integrated signal of complex biological responses enforced by the environment. For example, temporal change in stem increment integrates multiple information of tree performance, and wood anatomical traits may be altered by climatic extremes or environmental stress. Recent developments in preparative tools and computational image analysis enable to quantify changes in wood anatomical features, like vessel density or vessel size. Thus, impacts on their functioning can be related to climatic forcing factors. Similarly, new developments in monitoring (cambial) phenology and mechanistic modelling are enlightening the interrelationships between environmental factors, wood formation and tree performance and mortality. Quantitative wood anatomy is a reliable indicator of drought occurrence during the growing season, and therefore has been studied intensively in recent years. The variability in wood anatomy not only alters the biological and hydraulic functioning of a tree, but may also influence the technological properties of wood, with substantial impacts in forestry. On a larger scale, alterations of sapwood and phloem area and their ratios to other functional traits provide measures to detect changes in a tree’s life functions, and increasing risk of drought-induced mortality with possible impacts on hydrological processes and species composition of plant communities.

Genetic variability within and across populations is assumed to be crucial for species survival in an unpredictable future world. The magnitude of genetic variation and heritability of adaptive traits might define the ability to adapt to climate change. Is there a relation between genetic variability and resilience to climate change? Is it possible to link genetic expression and climate change to obtain deeper knowledge of functional genetics? To derive precise estimates of genetic determinism it is important to define adaptive traits in wood properties and on a whole-tree scale. Understanding the mechanisms ruling these processes is fundamental to assess the impact of extreme climate events on forest ecosystems, and to provide realistic scenarios of tree responses to changing climates. Wood is also a major carbon sink with a long-term residence, impacting the global carbon cycle. How well do we understand the link between wood growth dynamics, wood carbon allocation and the global carbon cycle?
Papers contribution to this Research Topic will cover a wide range of ecosystems. However, special relevance will be given to Mediterranean-type areas. These involve coastal regions of four continents, making Mediterranean-type ecosystems extremely interesting for investigating the potential impacts of global change on growth and for studying responses of woody plants under extreme environmental conditions. For example, the ongoing trend towards warmer temperatures and reduced precipitation can increase the susceptibility to fire and pests.

The EU-funded COST Action STREeSS (Studying Tree Responses to extreme Events: a SynthesiS) addresses such crucial tree biological and forest ecological issues by providing a collection of important methodological and scientific insights, about the current state of knowledge, and by opinions for future research needs.

ISBN: 978-2-88945-192-0; DOI: 10.3389/978-2-88945-192-0


IAWA2016 cover  

IAWA Journal: Functional traits in Wood Anatomy

Baas P., Beekman H., Cufar K., De Micco V. (eds.) (2016)

Natural and plantation forests, park and roadside trees, and even arctic, alpine and desert shrubs all depend on their wood or secondary xylem for hydraulic and mechanical fitness and biological defence. In recent decades the research community has become aware that the complex tissue of wood harbours a wealth of so-called functional traits that make natural and manmade ecosystems dynamic and sustainable. On the other hand, natural and anthropogenic stress factors such as prolonged or extreme droughts, floods, hurricanes and snow storms, which seem on the increase in our globally warming era, challenge the limits of functional xylem and phloem adaptations arisen over millions of years of adaptive evolution.

This special issue of the IAWA journal brings together 12 papers by researchers collaborating in the Functional Traits Topc Group of the Cost-Action FP1106 STReESS (Studying Tree Responses to extreme Events: a Synthesis) that was acitive from 2012-2016. Six papers are reviews of the literature dealing with the concept of functional traits in wood anatomy, and with individual functional traits such as porosity, various other growth ring markers, intra-annual density fluctuations (IADFs), inter-conduit pit membranes, vessel occlusions, and onset of sap conduction in earlywood vessels. The other six papers contain a wealth of original results ranging from cambium dynamics and phloen formation to growth ring and IADF analysis in European and Tropical forests exposed at increasing frequency to extreme events. This book is aimed at the research community and advanced students of plant biology, forestry, wood science, and global change.

Reprinted from IAWA Journal 37 (2), 2016
ISSN:0928-1541/ e-ISSN: 2294-1932, 368 pp.
International Association of Wood Anatomists c/o Naturalis Biodiversity Center
Price: EUR 25.00 or US$ 30.00 plus postage and handling
Please order directly from the IAWA Office: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. or This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.


Brill publishers is providing Free Access to all papers in the special Functional Traits issue till end of September 2016 through the following link: http://booksandjournals.brillonline.com/content/journals/22941932/37/2


 trees  

Trees: Sap flow and tree hydraulic functioning
Volume 30, Issue 1,  Pages 1-254, 2016

Bräuning, A., Steppe, K. (eds.)

This special section of Trees presents  papers of the Ninth International Workshop on Sap Flow, held in Ghent, Belgium, from 4 to 7 June 2013, and suported by Cost-Action FP1106 STReESS (Studying Tree Responses to extreme Events: a Synthesis). Five papers using a variety of scientific approaches, and addressing different studied tree ecophysiological and anatomical parameters are combined in a special section, while other papers have already been published in an earlier issue.

ISSN: 0931-1890 (Print) 1432-2285 (Online)

 



tree physiology 2015  

Tree Pysiology: Ninth International Workshop on Sap Flow
Volume 35, Issue 4,  Pages 341-449, 2015

Steppe, K. Vandegehuchte, M.W., Tognetti, R., Mencuccini, M. (eds.)

This special issue of Tree Physiology presents 10 papers of the Ninth International Workshop on Sap Flow, held in Ghent, Belgium, from 4 to 7 June 2013, and suported by Cost-Action FP1106 STReESS (Studying Tree Responses to extreme Events: a Synthesis)

 

 



tree physiology  

Tree Pysiology: Wood Structure in Ecophysiology
Volume 34, Issue 8,  Pages 787-913, 2014

Battipaglia, G., De Micco, V., Sass-Klaassen, U., Tognetti, R., Mäkelä, A. (eds.)

This special issue of Tree Physiology presents 8 original and 2 review papers of the International Symposium ‘WSE: Wood Structure in Plant Biology and Ecology’, held in Naples on 17–20 April 2013

 

 


Dendrochronologia  

Dendrochronologia
Volume 32, Issue 3, Pages 173-294, 2014

Battipaglia, G., De Micco,V. (eds.)

The special section of this issue of Dendrochronologia contains five papers on research presented at The International Symposium on “Wood Structure in Plant Biology and Ecology”, held in Naples (Italy) on 17–20 April 2013


IAWA special  

IAWA Journal: Wood Structure in Plant Biology and Ecology

Baas, P., Battipaglia, G., De Micco,V., Lens, F., Wheeler, E. (eds.) (2013)

This book contains a selection of papers presented at the successful meetings of the International Association of Wood Anatomists and the Cost-Action STReESS (Studying Tree Responses to extreme Events: a Synthesis) held in Naples in April 2013

Koninklijke Brill Publishers, Leiden, the Netherlands, 181 pp., 17 colour ill.
ISBN13:9789004265592, E-ISBN: 9789004265608.
Reprinted from IAWA Journal 34 (4), 2013

Price: EUR 20.00 (US$ 25.00) plus postage and handling

For other publications available from the IAWA Office, please visit www.iawa-website.org