All films and protocols produced by STReESS members and funded by our COST Action FP1106

 

Shaping future forests (2016)

Launched by the COST STReESS Steering Committee.
Shaping future forests was the Motto of our final COST STReESS meeting held in Joachimsthal, near Berlin in April 2016. This film tells the story of the our COST Action STReESS: the start, our plans, our ambitions and our activities during the last 4 years of active collaboration. COST STReESS created a powerful interdisciplinary community and succeeded in developing new concepts for understanding tree responses to extreme climate events which is relevant for Shaping future forests.
    
The script for this film was written by Hans Reijnen (R Media) and Ute Sass-Klaassen (COST STReESS chair, Wageningen University).
The film is produced by Hans Reijnen of R Media in association with the COST Action STReESS

Click on the play buttons below to start the Trailer or the Full version of the film.

Trailor (2:15 min)

Full version (14:27 min)


 

 

 tree survival film

 

Tree Survival: Future Challenges (2016)

Extreme climatic events often engender widespread tree mortality events, and it often takes years until trees die. In fact, mortality is only the final manifestation of a long-term process of vitality loss and thus, it is extremely difficult to identify stress factors, the mechanisms triggering mortality or the strategies which enable trees to survive. Tree Survival: Future Challenges film gathers the answers of European researches to five questions on tree mortality and survival.
The aim of the film is to stimulate the discussion but also to document the scientific statements about this topic.

Researchers in order of appearance are: Steven Jansen (Ulm University. Germany), Maxime Cailleret (ETH Zürich. Switzerland), Kathy Steppe (Ghent University. Belgium), Anna Lintunen (University of Helsinki. Finland), Georg von Arx (WSL. Switzerland), Floor Vodde (Estonian University of Life Sciences, Estonia), José M. Torres-Ruiz (INRA - University of Bordeaux. France), Raquel Lobo do Vale (ISA - University of Lisbon. Portugal), Mikko Peltoniemi (Natural Resources Institute Finland Luke. Finland), Jordi Martínez-Vilalta (CREAF & Autonomous University of Barcelona. Spain), Lucía DeSoto (Centre for Functional Ecology. Portugal), Ute Sass-Klaassen (Wageningen UR. Netherlands).

The film is produced by all the participants in association with the COST Action STReESS "Studying Tree Responses to extreme Events: a SynthesiS".

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qwa film2

 

Quantitative Wood Anatomy: From Sample to Data for Environmental Research (2015)

Launched by the Dendroclimatology group, Swiss Federal Institute of Forest, Snow and Landscape Research WSL (Switzerland) in cooperation with the Department of Land, Environment, Agriculture and Forestry (TESAF), University of Padova (Italy), the Department of Wood Science and Technology, University of Ljubliana (Slovenia), and the Forest Ecology and Forest Management Group, Wageningen University (Netherlands).

Quantitative wood anatomy investigates relationships between plant growth, functioning and environment, and typically also how these relationships change over time. It is a challenging multi-step approach, in which deficiencies in one step propagate to the following steps with negative consequences for data quality. This film gives and overview of how to quantify anatomical features in digital images, presents guidelines and pitfalls, and introduces different anatomical metrics used for environmental research.

The script for this film was written by Georg von Arx (Dendroclimatology group, Swiss Federal Institute of Forest, Snow and Landscape Research WSL).

The film is produced by Hans Reijnen of R Media in association with the COST Action STReESS

Citation: G von Arx, A Stritih, K Čufar, A Crivellaro, M Carrer. 2015. Quantitative Wood Anatomy: From Sample to Data for Environmental Research. DOI: 10.13140/RG.2.1.3323.0169

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2nd video

 

Wood Sample Preparation for Microscopic Analysis (2014)

Launched by the Department of Wood Science and Technology, University Ljubljana (Slovenia) in cooperation with the Slovenian Forest Institute and the Department of Geography and Regional Planning, University Zaragoza (Spain).
The film shows in detail how to process high-quality permanent thin sections for xylem and phloem formation studies following the embedding in paraffin methodology.
In contrast to the non-permanent method, demonstrated by Lena Wegner in her film "Micro-core Processing", this embedding in paraffin is a more time consuming process and requires specific equipment.

The script is based on the protocol written by Peter Prislan (Department of Wood Science and Technology, University Ljubljana).

The film is produced by Peter Prislan et al. and edited by Hans Reijnen of R Media in association with the COST Action STReESS

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micro core video

 

Micro-core Processing (2013)

Launched by the DendroLab of Wageningen UR (The Netherlands). 
The film shows in detail how to process micro-core samples (max 2mm diameter) and make (non-permanent) thin sections for dendrochronological and wood anatomical research in a quick, easy and low cost way.

The script is based on the protocol written by Lena Wegner (MSc student of Wageningen University). Lena encountered problems when gluing the small micro cores on to wooden holders in the usual way: the cores shrunk during the necessary drying time of the glue, causing cracks and making the samples unusable. Imbedding in paraffin can be a solution to the problem but is a very time consuming method and requires expensive equipment. The method Lena developed is easy, quick and doesn't require special equipment.

The film is produced by Hans Reijnen of R Media in association with the COST Action STReESS

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